Welcome to Northwest Industrial 

The smallest residential population of any of Portland’s neighborhoods owes to the fact that most of the Northwest Industrial neighborhood is protected for industrial use. This hasn’t stopped a small number of tasteful urban lofts and condos from popping up. Change is coming, however, and may soon be more than just for rubbernecking on your way to St. John’s. 


Northwest Industrial At-A-Glance

Where is Northwest Industrial?
Northwest Industrial is a neighborhood in Northwest Portland, Oregon on the bank of the Willamette River and bordered by the Forest park and Northwest Neighborhoods.  The Northwest Industrial Neighborhood Association is part of the Northwest District Association and is included in City of Portland's Office of Neighborhood Involvement.  


Real Estate Year-in-Review for 97210
Home sales within the 97210 Zip Code kept pace with the Portland Metro real estate market.  Based on data from Regional Multiple Listing Service (RMLS), there were 212 homes sold last year with an average sales price of $767,902. The average Combined Days On Market (CDOM) for 97210 in 2016 was 44 days. The Sold-Price Ratio was 98.57 percent, which denotes the percentage of difference between the original list price and the sale price. Buyers were represented by their own agent (separate from the listing agent) in 87.74% of the transactions listed in RMLS for this Zip Code.


Northwest Industrial Schools
Neighborhood attendance areas for the Northwest Industrial neighborhood include the following schools: Chapman Elementary (K-5), West Sylvan Middle School and Lincoln High School. For more information on schools, bus schedules, attendance areas and a host of other useful information please visit Portland Public Schools. For ratings, visit GreatSchools.org.


Northwest Industrial Demographics
According to public records, the Northwest Industrial neighborhood has a total of 6,390 total households with more white collar workers (8,447) than blue collar workers (4,580). Most residents are college educated. 3,219 residents have a Bachelor’s Degree, while 3,250 have post-graduate degrees. Median income for those aged 45-64 is $76,116, while those over 65 show a median income of $71,129. Average household income is $85,972. Average household net worth is $543,190.


Northwest Industrial Lifestyle

The smallest residential population of any of Portland’s neighborhoods owes to the fact that most of the Northwest Industrial neighborhood is protected for industrial use. This hasn’t stopped a small number of tasteful urban lofts and condos from popping up. Change is coming, however, and may soon be more than just for rubbernecking on your way to St. John’s.

In recent history there have been few reasons to consider this neighborhood as a place to live – but recently some highly desirable apartment complexes have cropped up on Front Street. These are refined offerings, all new construction and loaded with amenities you’re not likely to find in the vintage apartment buildings in the nearby Alphabet District.

Among the many advantages to living on Front Street is its easy access to either side of the river – the Steel Bridge will run you over to the East Side in no time, and downtown is a New York minute away.

Northwest Industrial Neighborhood receives the following grades from Walk Score: Walk Score: 14, Transit Score: 43, Bike Score: 36.

 
 Stan Davis, Principal Broker Tigen & Hill Realty Group (503) 123-4567

Stan Davis, Principal Broker
Tigen & Hill Realty Group
(503) 123-4567


  M. Timothy Smythe, Sr Loan Officer   Local Lender Inc   (503)   987-6543

M. Timothy Smythe, Sr Loan Officer
Local Lender Inc
(503) 987-6543


  Janet Evans, Senior Escrow Officer   National Title Company   (503)   987-6543

Janet Evans, Senior Escrow Officer
National Title Company
(503) 987-6543


Getting Around Northwest Portland

At the heart of the city is Portland’s compact and cozy downtown. Nestled alongside the bank of the Willamette River, Downtown Portland boasts an impressive array of cultural attractions, luxury shopping venues and award-winning eateries.  Add to that highly walkable city streets and ever more stylish, bespoke apartments and you get a destination that attract professionals and executives alike.

Portland 5 Center for the Arts, one of the top 5 largest performing arts centers in the country, is comprised of the Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, the Keller, Newmark, Brunish and Winningstad Theaters, and the Antoinette Hatfield Hall.  On any given date these venues offer world-class performances, acts and entertainers from around the world. 

Just a short walk from the Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall is the Portland Art Museum, distinguished for its collection of art of the native peoples of North America. The seventh oldest museum in the United States is actually a collection of landmark buildings including the Jubitz Center for Modern and Contemporary Art, the Gilkey Center for Graphic Arts, and the Northwest Film Center. 

Pioneer Courthouse Square - affectionately known as ‘Portland’s Living Room’ - is a public space occupying a full 40,000 square foot city block in the heart of downtown. Not to be confused with, but equally important to mention, is Pioneer Place, an upscale, urban shopping experience (combining a mix of retail, dining and office space) distrubited among between four buildings and interconnected by skywalks or underground mall sections. Here you’ll find recognizable and high-end brand stores like Apple, BCBCMaxazria, Louis Vuitton and Tumi.

Portland's South Park Blocks are a concatenation of city blocks (on Park, not surprisingly, between Salmon to Jackson Streets) that form an 8-acre urban greenspace and home to Portland’s ever popular Farmer’s Market every Saturday (from March to December) that draws up to 14,000 people each weekend. 

One of the most popular destinations is Downtown’s waterfront. There you’ll enjoy Tom McCall Waterfront Park (home to the Blues Fest), RiverPlace Marina and the Esplanade.  

One often overlooked benefit of downtown living is providing nearby options for out-of-town visitors. Portland’s high concentration of award-winning and historic hotels and suites makes the visit from the in-laws something to look forward to. To duly impress, choose the Benson, an opulent and grandiose choice, or for something a bit more contemporary, The Nines on Morrison will satisfy even the most discerning guest. Other popular choices include The Heathman, The Mallory, The Ace, The Westin and several Kimpton properties to choose from - The Hotel Monaco on 5th and Washington stands out.

And of of course there’s more than just Voodoo Donuts when it comes to dining options. Everything from Higgin’s - the groundbreaking restaurant that promoted the ‘farm-to-table’ movement ahead of its time -  to top-chef runner up Gregory Gourdet’s Departure. There’s also the laid back but noteworthy Shigezo, and nearby you’ll find Southpark Seafood, arguably deserving a place among the best seafood restaurants in Oregon. This is just a small tease of what Downtown has to offer. Even staying with the most critic-worthy restaurants in Downtown alone would require entries too numerous to mention.

It must be noted that everything mentioned here is within walking distance. No subways to catch or ride share apps necessary, no Tri Met schedules to navigate, no stepping out onto the curb to hail a taxi. Portland is small, but not insignificant. It’s cozy, not restricting. It’s all there.  

Visit here once and you’ll immediately understand why Portland fights well-above its weight, receiving high-praise from non other than the New York Times.

 


Need Public Transit To Get Around?
Plan your trip, get arrivals in real-time or see detours, delays and closures at TriMet.org. Want the mobile app or ability to pay by phone? Download the iPhone or Android app.


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